Report | Environment Washington Research and Policy Center

Rough Waters Ahead Factsheet

Millions of Americans live in the Puget Sound watershed, and millions more come each year to fish, boat and enjoy its water and wildlife. But intense human activity has polluted the Sound. The Environmental Protection Agency has been vital to protecting Puget Sound, holding polluters accountable and working with state, local and tribal governments to clean up and restore the Sound. That work is in jeopardy because the Trump administration has proposed cutting the EPA’s budget by 31 percent.

This fact sheet summarizes the findings of our Rough Waters Ahead report.   The full report can be found on the homepage.

Report | Environment Washington Research and Policy Center

Rough Waters Ahead

Clean water in Puget Sound is critical to the health and welfare of our families, our communities, and wildlife.  A new report documents how proposed federal budget cuts by the Trump Administration would increase pollution in the Puget Sound and undermine the recovery efforts that have done so much to restore this beautiful natural resource.

Report | Environment Washington

Repealing the Clean Water Rule would be devastating for Puget Sound

New analysis by Environment Washington shows 48% of all stream miles in the Puget Sound Watershed will be left without federal protections by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Scott Pruitt’s proposal to repeal the Clean Water Rule. The Clean Water Rule restored federal protections to half our nation’s streams and thousands of wetlands across the country, including 7,671 miles of streams in the Puget Sound basin.

Report | Environment Washington Research and Policy Center

Get the Lead Out

Given the high toxicity of lead to children, the most health-protective policy is simply to “get the lead out” of our schools and pre-schools.  This involves pro-actively removing lead-bearing parts from schools’ drinking water systems – from service lines to faucets and fixtures – and installing certified filters at every tap used for drinking or cooking.  While all this prevention work cannot all happen at once, schools should immediately begin regular and proper testing of all water outlets used for drinking or cooking and promptly remove from service those outlets where lead is detected.  And schools should provide the public with easy access to all testing data and the status of remediation plans.